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Une interprétation politique de la représentation pontificale en Syrie et au Liban : Frediano Giannini et les Églises orientales face au mandat français (1918-1936)

Abstract : At the beginning of the French mandate in Syria and Lebanon, the Holy See develops new aims and means of action. We have studied them through the letters written to Rome by Mons. Frediano Giannini, vicar apostolic of Aleppo and apostolic delegate in Syria from 1905 to 1936. Giannini’s reports provide a good example of the way missionaries produce knowledge about Eastern Christian communities. He tells about the trials and migrations endured by them, thus taking part in the development of a new perception of Christian communities as persecuted minorities. Giannini turns to French authorities in order to defend Christians’ interests (both Catholics’ and Orthodox’). His position is ambiguous: he feels nostalgic about the traditional French protectorate, and in the same time involves himself in political matters, taking on part of the French former role. This ambivalence reveals the rise of a new pontifical policy, based on increasing autonomy and centralization.
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Submitted on : Tuesday, December 3, 2019 - 4:25:38 PM
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Édouard Coquet. Une interprétation politique de la représentation pontificale en Syrie et au Liban : Frediano Giannini et les Églises orientales face au mandat français (1918-1936). Social sciences and missions/Sciences sociales et missions, Brill, 2019, 32 (3-4), pp.281-310. ⟨10.1163/18748945-03203005⟩. ⟨hal-02391678⟩

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