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Journal Articles Nature Communications Year : 2022

Inorganic phosphate in growing calcium carbonate abalone shell suggests a shared mineral ancestral precursor

Abstract

Abstract The presence of phosphate from different origins (inorganic, bioorganic) is found more and more in calcium carbonate-based biominerals. Phosphate is often described as being responsible for the stabilization of the transient amorphous calcium carbonate phase. In order to specify the composition of the mineral phase deposited at the onset of carbonated shell formation, the present study investigates, down to the nanoscale, the growing shell from the European abalone Haliotis tuberculata , using a combination of solid state nuclear magnetic resonance, scanning transmission electron microscope and spatially-resolved electron energy loss spectroscopy techniques. We show the co-occurrence of inorganic phosphate with calcium and carbonate throughout the early stages of abalone shell formation. One possible hypothesis is that this first-formed mixed mineral phase represents the vestige of a shared ancestral mineral precursor that appeared early during Evolution. In addition, our findings strengthen the idea that the final crystalline phase (calcium carbonate or phosphate) depends strongly on the nature of the mineral-associated proteins in vivo.
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Dates and versions

hal-03615631 , version 1 (21-03-2022)

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Widad Ajili, Camila Tovani, Justine Fouassier, Marta de Frutos, Guillaume Laurent, et al.. Inorganic phosphate in growing calcium carbonate abalone shell suggests a shared mineral ancestral precursor. Nature Communications, 2022, 13 (1), pp.1496. ⟨10.1038/s41467-022-29169-9⟩. ⟨hal-03615631⟩
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