Respiratory Tract Infections in Diabetes – Lessons From Tuberculosis and Influenza to Guide Understanding of COVID-19 Severity - Sorbonne Université Access content directly
Journal Articles Frontiers in Endocrinology Year : 2022

Respiratory Tract Infections in Diabetes – Lessons From Tuberculosis and Influenza to Guide Understanding of COVID-19 Severity

Abstract

Patients with type-2 diabetes (T2D) are more likely to develop severe respiratory tract infections. Such susceptibility has gained increasing attention since the global spread of Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) in early 2020. The earliest reports marked T2D as an important risk-factor for severe forms of disease and mortality across all adult age groups. Several mechanisms have been proposed for this increased susceptibility, including pre-existing immune dysfunction, a lack of metabolic flexibility due to insulin resistance, inadequate dietary quality or adverse interactions with antidiabetic treatments or common comorbidities. Some mechanisms that predispose patients with T2D to severe COVID-19 may indeed be shared with other previously characterized respiratory tract infections. Accordingly, in this review, we give an overview of response to Influenza A virus and to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infections. Similar risk factors and mechanisms are discussed between the two conditions and in the case of COVID-19. Lastly, we address emerging approaches to address research needs in infection and metabolic disease, and perspectives with regards to deployment or repositioning of metabolically active therapeutics.

Dates and versions

hal-03905102 , version 1 (17-12-2022)

Identifiers

Cite

Amnah Al-Sayyar, Katina Hulme, Ronan Thibaut, Jagadeesh Bayry, Frederick Sheedy, et al.. Respiratory Tract Infections in Diabetes – Lessons From Tuberculosis and Influenza to Guide Understanding of COVID-19 Severity. Frontiers in Endocrinology, 2022, 13, ⟨10.3389/fendo.2022.919223⟩. ⟨hal-03905102⟩
18 View
0 Download

Altmetric

Share

Gmail Mastodon Facebook X LinkedIn More