Prescribing of Electronic Activity Monitors in Cardiometabolic Diseases: Qualitative Interview-Based Study

Abstract : Background: The prevalence of noncommunicable diseases, including those such as type 2 diabetes, obesity, dyslipidemia, and hypertension, so-called cardiometabolic diseases, is high and is increasing worldwide. Strong evidence supports the role of physical activity in management of these diseases. There is general consensus that mHealth technology, including electronic activity monitors, can potentially increase physical activity in patients, but their use in clinical settings remains limited. Practitioners’ requirements when prescribing electronic activity monitors have been poorly described. Objective: The aims of this qualitative study were (1) to explore how specialist physicians prescribe electronic activity monitors to patients presenting with cardiometabolic conditions, and (2) to better understand their motivation for and barriers to prescribing such monitors. Methods: We conducted qualitative semistructured interviews in March to May 2016 with 11 senior physicians from a public university hospital in France with expertise in management of cardiometabolic diseases (type 1 and type 2 diabetes, obesity, hypertension, and dyslipidemia). Interviews lasted 45 to 60 minutes and were audiotaped, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed using directed content analysis. We report our findings following the Consolidated Criteria for Reporting Qualitative Research (COREQ) checklist. Results: Most physicians we interviewed had never prescribed electronic activity monitors, whereas they frequently prescribed blood glucose or blood pressure self-monitoring devices. Reasons for nonprescription included lack of interest in the data collected, lack of evidence for data accuracy, concern about work overload possibly resulting from automatic data transfer, and risk of patients becoming addicted to data. Physicians expected future marketing of easy-to-use monitors that will accurately measure physical activity duration and intensity and provide understandable motivating feedback. Conclusions: Features of electronic activity monitors, although popular among the general public, do not meet the needs of physicians. In-depth understanding of physicians’ expectations is a first step toward designing technologies that can be widely used in clinical settings and facilitate physical activity prescription. Physicians should have a role, along with key health care stakeholders—patients, researchers, information technology firms, the public, and private payers—in developing the most effective methods for integrating activity monitors into patient care.
Type de document :
Article dans une revue
Journal of Medical Internet Research, Journal of Medical Internet Research, 2017, 19 (9), pp.e328. 〈10.2196/jmir.8107〉
Liste complète des métadonnées

Littérature citée [29 références]  Voir  Masquer  Télécharger

https://hal.sorbonne-universite.fr/hal-01617975
Contributeur : Gestionnaire Hal-Upmc <>
Soumis le : mardi 17 octobre 2017 - 12:09:12
Dernière modification le : vendredi 31 août 2018 - 09:02:02
Document(s) archivé(s) le : jeudi 18 janvier 2018 - 14:05:34

Fichier

fc-xsltGalley-8107-146308-34-P...
Publication financée par une institution

Licence


Distributed under a Creative Commons Paternité 4.0 International License

Identifiants

Collections

Citation

Alice Bellicha, Sandrine Macé, Jean-Michel Oppert. Prescribing of Electronic Activity Monitors in Cardiometabolic Diseases: Qualitative Interview-Based Study. Journal of Medical Internet Research, Journal of Medical Internet Research, 2017, 19 (9), pp.e328. 〈10.2196/jmir.8107〉. 〈hal-01617975〉

Partager

Métriques

Consultations de la notice

305

Téléchargements de fichiers

44